Dual encoders DIY

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7. January 2018 by Peter

Rebuilding my cockpit I have had a lot of problems with my USB connections.

I decreased the numbers on computers in use from 6 to 3. Still one P3D pc and then only two additional PC’s to handle everything else. All config files and SIOC scripts has been copied so it should be plug’n’play. But it is not! With 9 different interface board connected via USB it quickly gets messy and things are not working as they did before.

It turns out my Pokeys56U card can not be connected to my computer at start up. The computer will not start if it is connected. My solution is buying Pokeys57E cards instead. They are not USB connected.

I hane problems with my pedestal. It used OpenCockpits cards and are connected to an other computer then the one that runs Prosim737. My problem is that my NAV and COM-radios not are able to tune / change the frequency. The ADF and XPNDR works. So it is all very strange. I am using a special script (which is fantastic and made by Gert/Belgianguy) where single encoders are used and you push&turn to change the decimals. I think that script somehow is causing the problems. We Gert and I have not been able to figure out what is wrong. So I am kind of stuck.

My solution is switching to dual encoders. It is about time I guess. However dual encoders does not come cheap. Including shipping they are €25 a piece. And after just spending money on a new graphics card and Pokeys57U cards I need something cheaper.
When I made my EFIS I modified a rotary switch so I could fit a encoder behind. I guess I can do the same with the radios. Furthermore I once saw you can wire a rotary switch as an encoder. So I am trying that out in the next couple of weeks.

However I could not remember how to modify that rotary switch. It is something with drilling a hold through. But a what diameter? I could not remember. So I googled it and on page one I found a tutorial made by – well – me. 🙂
I already ruined one rotary switch yesterday when trying to drill the hole. This was due to a too low speed on the drill. Maintain as high a speed as possible to avoid the “teeth” on the drille turns it is an unwanted direction.

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